Publication: Babbage - The Economist

First reported 11 hours ago - Updated 11 hours ago - 1 reports

Thou shalt not kill, in theory

THE street protests in Ferguson, Missouri have been met with a range of so-called non-lethal weaponry, including sonic blasters, rubber balls, stun grenades and tear gas. There has been much debate about whether the authorities' response was disproportionate. ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - 11 hours ago]
First reported Aug 27 2014 - Updated Aug 27 2014 - 1 reports

Divining reality from the hype

Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames. OVER the past few decades it has become clear that innovation—more than inputs of capital and labour—is what drives a modern economy. In the developed world, the application ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 27 2014]
First reported Aug 26 2014 - Updated Aug 27 2014 - 1 reports

A saline solution to global warming?

THIS week our correspondents discuss Amazon’s purchase of Twitch and the reasons behind the recent pause in global warming Continue reading ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 26 2014]
First reported Aug 20 2014 - Updated Aug 20 2014 - 1 reports

Petals to the metal

WALK into a florist in America and take a deep breath: beneath the heady scents of petals and pollen, you might just catch a whiff of jet fuel. Nearly three-quarters of all the flowers sold in the US have travelled through Miami International Airport ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 20 2014]
First reported Aug 19 2014 - Updated Aug 19 2014 - 1 reports

Rideshare dust-ups and space dust

THIS week our correspondents discuss the Uber-Lyft rideshare war and dust particles from interstellar space  Continue reading ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 19 2014]
First reported Aug 18 2014 - Updated Aug 18 2014 - 1 reports

You have been hacked!

THE theft by a Russian syndicate of 1.2 billion username and password combinations from 420,000 websites around the world means that the personal details of almost half of all users of the internet must now be considered severely compromised. It can ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 18 2014]
First reported Aug 16 2014 - Updated Aug 16 2014 - 1 reports

Had a very shiny? No

A CENTRAL character in Rossini's opera La Gazza Ladra is the titular magpie. The opera's rising action begins with the bird's theft of a silver spoon, and later, a silver coin. European folklore abounds with examples of the magpie's love of both shiny ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 16 2014]
Entities: Magpie, Interaction, Silver
First reported Aug 14 2014 - Updated Aug 14 2014 - 1 reports

Hot or not?

THERE is a long list of technical innovations that start out as the preserve of the military or academia but end up ubiquitous. The last stage of the spread seems to be integration into mobile phones-as has happened with digital photography and GPS-enabled ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 14 2014]
First reported Aug 12 2014 - Updated Aug 12 2014 - 1 reports

Probing questions

THIS week our correspondents discuss the Rosetta space probe's triangular "orbit", and the reality of net neutrality Continue reading ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 12 2014]
Entities: Net Neutrality
First reported Aug 12 2014 - Updated Aug 12 2014 - 1 reports

A shock heard 'round the world

THE title of glacial seismologist is, relatively speaking, a new one in science. It took until the early 1950s for scientists at Baffin Island in Canada to report “icequakes”, the sudden movement of ice and frozen, saturated earth. The field has grown ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 12 2014]
First reported Aug 08 2014 - Updated Aug 09 2014 - 1 reports

Understanding Ebola

WITH around 1,700 suspected cases and more than 900 deaths, the outbreak of Ebola haemorrhagic fever in four West African countries is the biggest ever recorded. On August 8th the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the epidemic an "international ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 08 2014]
First reported Aug 08 2014 - Updated Aug 08 2014 - 1 reports

The joys of monomania

THERE is something admirable about people with a passion for forms of media that have fallen by the wayside—black-and-white films, vinyl records, silver-halide photography, lithographic printing and other relics of analogue expression that have been ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 08 2014]

Quotes

MAURICE Sendak said that "there's so much more to a book than just the reading" and in the burgeoning economy of e-books, there's so much more to a service than just the number of titles...
"WE JUST made contact. I need to talk to you in 30 minutes" says Keith Cowing, the editor of NASA Watch, an online publication...
...handed out to audiences of the film " Polyester " with numbered squares that were to be scratched when corresponding numbers flashed on screen. " The Essential Scratch and Sniff Guide to Becoming a Wine Expert ", a recent book by master sommelier Richard Betts , uses scratch-and-sniff technology to teach readers how to use common scents to discuss the different elements in a wine's fragrance. A similar process is used for an absurdly long list of other purposes—including laundry detergents, some baking mixes and aspirin—and was invented for carbonless paper, a distant memory in this age of ink-jet and laser printers. All of these products rely on micro-encapsulation, a technique that coats exceedingly fine droplets, particles or gases that need to remain in a stable, isolated state with a soluble or penetrable wrapper, typically made of a polymer. Depending on the application or substance, a capsule may be as tiny as 50... Continue reading "
...oversees the PhoneSat, says that the billions of dollars invested in smartphones by the telecoms industry has led many, including NASA, to ask: "Could we leverage this technology to do the sorts... Continue reading "

More Content

All (199) | News (0) | Reports (0) | Blogs (199) | Audio/Video (0) | Fact Sheets (0) | Press Releases (0)
sort by: Date | Relevance
Thou shalt not kill, in theory [Published Babbage - The Economist - 11 hours ago]
Divining reality from the hype [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 27 2014]
A saline solution to global warming? [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 26 2014]
Petals to the metal [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 20 2014]
Rideshare dust-ups and space dust [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 19 2014]
You have been hacked! [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 18 2014]
Had a very shiny? No [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 16 2014]
Hot or not? [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 14 2014]
Probing questions [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 12 2014]
A shock heard 'round the world [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 12 2014]
Understanding Ebola [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 08 2014]
The joys of monomania [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 08 2014]
Grasping at claws [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 07 2014]
How not to stop Ebola's spread [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 05 2014]
Wanted: a tinkerer’s charter [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 04 2014]
How the Labrador got its spots [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 01 2014]
Where culture goes to die [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 31 2014]
Listen like a fly on the wall [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 29 2014]
The Pacific's wayward child [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 28 2014]
Messi v the Machines [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 25 2014]
Now hear only this [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 25 2014]
Not for plucking [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 24 2014]
Leading light and e-bookworms [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 23 2014]
On the volume of volumes [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 22 2014]
Where gadgets go to die [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 19 2014]
Big data, small wins [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 16 2014]
Getting from C to B [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 16 2014]
Zeroing in [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 16 2014]
In praise of the humble USB [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 14 2014]
Defending the digital frontier [Published Babbage - The Economist - Jul 10 2014]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
In Focus
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Content Volume
Document Volume
Network
Network

Blogs

sort by: Date | Relevance
Thou shalt not kill, in theory [Published Babbage - The Economist - 11 hours ago]
THE street protests in Ferguson, Missouri have been met with a range of so-called non-lethal weaponry, including sonic blasters, rubber balls, stun grenades and tear gas. There has been much debate about whether the authorities' response was disproportionate. ...
Divining reality from the hype [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 27 2014]
Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames. OVER the past few decades it has become clear that innovation—more than inputs of capital and labour—is what drives a modern economy. In the developed world, the application ...
A saline solution to global warming? [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 26 2014]
THIS week our correspondents discuss Amazon’s purchase of Twitch and the reasons behind the recent pause in global warming Continue reading ...
Petals to the metal [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 20 2014]
WALK into a florist in America and take a deep breath: beneath the heady scents of petals and pollen, you might just catch a whiff of jet fuel. Nearly three-quarters of all the flowers sold in the US have travelled through Miami International Airport ...
Rideshare dust-ups and space dust [Published Babbage - The Economist - Aug 19 2014]
THIS week our correspondents discuss the Uber-Lyft rideshare war and dust particles from interstellar space  Continue reading ...
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Contact Us
Sales
Support


Freebase CC-BY Some image thumbnails are sourced from Freebase, licensed under CC-BY

Copyright (C) 2014 Silobreaker Ltd. All rights reserved.
The selection and placement of stories and images on any Silobreaker page are determined automatically by a computer program.
The time or date displayed reflects when an article was added to or updated in Silobreaker.