Publication: Babbage - The Economist

First reported 4 hours ago - Updated 4 hours ago - 1 reports

Baked brains

LATER this month, Washington will hold an unusual lottery: it will select 334 lucky winners of licences to sell recreational marijuana in the Pacific-Northwestern state. If all goes to plan, some of those pot shops will be serving stoners (who in ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - 4 hours ago]
First reported 10 hours ago - Updated 9 hours ago - 1 reports

Is big data bullshit?

The IPCC on mitigating climate change, the big data backlash and reusable rockets   ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - 10 hours ago]
First reported Apr 15 2014 - Updated Apr 15 2014 - 1 reports

Papering over e-books

ONE might easily think that print publishing is a fussy business: all of that preparation to put ink on paper seems rather last century—or last half millennium. Electronic books have been hailed as the future and the perfection of the codex format, ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 15 2014]
First reported Apr 14 2014 - Updated Apr 14 2014 - 1 reports

Yours to cut out and keep

IF EVER a technology were ripe for disruption, it is the microscope. Benchtop microscopes have remained essentially unchanged since the 19th century—their shape a cartoonist’s cliché of science akin to alchemical glassware and Bunsen burners. And ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 14 2014]
First reported Apr 13 2014 - Updated Apr 13 2014 - 1 reports

Rebels without a cause?

CARBON DIOXIDE, when dissolved in water, creates an acid. The continued rise in greenhouse-gas emissions means that since recordings began in the 1980s, the acidity of the oceans has risen from pH 8.11 to pH 8.06 (on the pH scale, lower numbers mean ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 13 2014]
Entities: Carbon Dioxide, Acidic, Acid
First reported Apr 11 2014 - Updated Apr 11 2014 - 1 reports

Much to crow about

FROM ancient cave art in France to Van Gogh’s last painting, members of the crow family, or corvids, have inspired mythology and literature implying their intelligence to be superior to that of other animals. Indeed, corvids are cleverer than most birds, ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 11 2014]
First reported Apr 09 2014 - Updated Apr 10 2014 - 1 reports

Dark matter: not so dark

NEW hints of dark matter, the IBM System 360 mainframe computer at 50, and regenerating the thymus organ ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 09 2014]
First reported Apr 08 2014 - Updated Apr 10 2014 - 1 reports

End of the road for Windows XP

THIS week sees the last batch of bug fixes and security patches that Microsoft will issue for Windows XP. After April 8th, computers using the 13-year-old operating system will continue to work just fine, but all technical support for XP—whether paid ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 08 2014]
First reported Apr 10 2014 - Updated Apr 10 2014 - 1 reports

Cancer quests

HOW can playing on an app generate scientific meaning? It’s a question that Cancer Research UK may have just answered at a favourable time:  the use of mobile games increased by 66% last year . The charity enlisted the help of gaming experts at tech ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 10 2014]
First reported Apr 09 2014 - Updated Apr 09 2014 - 1 reports

Flying with the sun

IT LOOKS like being one of the most uncomfortable long-haul flights ever. This much is obvious from the unveiling in Switzerland on April 9th of Solar Impulse 2, an aircraft ungainly in appearance with a 72 metre (236 foot) wingspan, bigger than that ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 09 2014]
First reported Apr 09 2014 - Updated Apr 09 2014 - 1 reports

A digital heart attack

THE Heartbeat Bug sounds like a particularly nasty coronary complication. But it is in fact a software flaw that has left up to two-thirds of the world’s websites vulnerable to attack by hackers. According to researchers who uncovered the bug in popular ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 09 2014]
First reported Apr 08 2014 - Updated Apr 08 2014 - 1 reports

End of the road for Windows XP

THIS week sees the last batch of bug fixes and security patches that Microsoft will issue for Windows XP. After April 8th, computers using the 13-year-old operating system will continue to work just fine, but all technical support for XP—whether paid ... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 08 2014]

Quotes

..."Loveline" (co-hosted with "Dr DrewDrew Pinsky) and the cable TV "The Man Show" (with Jimmy Fallon) to a self-owned podcast, " The Adam Carolla Show ". His programme has consistently topped Apple's iTunes charts as the top download. It is supported through advertising. Thus it is no surprise that Mr Carolla's reaction to his company, ACE Broadcasting Network, being sued a year ago by Personal Audio , a non-practicing patentholding entity (a "patent troll"), was to speak out fiercely and at length. Personal Audio has a patent issued to it in 2012 that, according to one of its founders, James Logan, covers the production of serialised or episodic content that can be downloaded from a specific URL that client software can retrieve and store—effectively the... Continue reading "
Ms Hulton became interested in electronics at a young age, as her father was a memory-chip designer. "My dad gave me a bunch of wires. Showed me how to hook up a battery and a lightbulb and said, 'Have fun.' I'm pretty certain I almost set the carpet in my bedroom on fire" she says. He brought her regularly to work as a child, where his colleagues would teach her about basic circuitry layout...
...argues that the real boogeymen are not amies, spies, the police and other purveyors of "hard power", but political campaigns, advertisers and other " hidden persuaders ", who are trying to use this data to subtly manipulate our... Continue reading "
We know very little about diet and health. That's why so much is written about it (David Colquhoun). "Almost every single nutrient imaginable has peer reviewed publications associating it with almost any outcome."

More Content

All (101) | News (0) | Reports (0) | Blogs (101) | Audio/Video (0) | Fact Sheets (0) | Press Releases (0)
sort by: Date | Relevance
Baked brains [Published Babbage - The Economist - 4 hours ago]
Is big data bullshit? [Published Babbage - The Economist - 10 hours ago]
Papering over e-books [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 15 2014]
Yours to cut out and keep [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 14 2014]
Rebels without a cause? [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 13 2014]
Much to crow about [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 11 2014]
Cancer quests [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 10 2014]
Dark matter: not so dark [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 09 2014]
Flying with the sun [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 09 2014]
A digital heart attack [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 09 2014]
End of the road for Windows XP [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 08 2014]
End of the road for Windows XP [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 08 2014]
Sunsets and scientists [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 08 2014]
What comes around... [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 07 2014]
Dark matter [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 04 2014]
Anchors aweigh [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 04 2014]
Picking over the traces [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 03 2014]
A stern warming [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 02 2014]
Homeopathy: the solution to humanity's woes [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 02 2014]
Barking up the right tree [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 02 2014]
Bitcoins run hot and cold [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 01 2014]
Managing without brackets [Published Babbage - The Economist - Mar 31 2014]
Dark matter [Published Babbage - The Economist - Mar 28 2014]
A digital fortress? [Published Babbage - The Economist - Mar 28 2014]
Immigrants from the future [Published Babbage - The Economist - Mar 27 2014]
Paywalls open doors [Published Babbage - The Economist - Mar 27 2014]
Clamping down on tweets [Published Babbage - The Economist - Mar 26 2014]
Turning tables [Published Babbage - The Economist - Mar 26 2014]
A podcast patent piper wants to be paid [Published Babbage - The Economist - Mar 25 2014]
Mirror, mirror on the wall [Published Babbage - The Economist - Mar 24 2014]
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sort by: Date | Relevance
Baked brains [Published Babbage - The Economist - 4 hours ago]
LATER this month, Washington will hold an unusual lottery: it will select 334 lucky winners of licences to sell recreational marijuana in the Pacific-Northwestern state. If all goes to plan, some of those pot shops will be serving stoners (who in ...
Is big data bullshit? [Published Babbage - The Economist - 10 hours ago]
The IPCC on mitigating climate change, the big data backlash and reusable rockets   ...
Papering over e-books [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 15 2014]
ONE might easily think that print publishing is a fussy business: all of that preparation to put ink on paper seems rather last century—or last half millennium. Electronic books have been hailed as the future and the perfection of the codex format, ...
Yours to cut out and keep [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 14 2014]
IF EVER a technology were ripe for disruption, it is the microscope. Benchtop microscopes have remained essentially unchanged since the 19th century—their shape a cartoonist’s cliché of science akin to alchemical glassware and Bunsen burners. And ...
Rebels without a cause? [Published Babbage - The Economist - Apr 13 2014]
CARBON DIOXIDE, when dissolved in water, creates an acid. The continued rise in greenhouse-gas emissions means that since recordings began in the 1980s, the acidity of the oceans has risen from pH 8.11 to pH 8.06 (on the pH scale, lower numbers mean ...
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
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