Publication: Banyan - The Economist

First reported 8 hours ago - Updated 3 hours ago - 1 reports

Hanging tough

IT IS one of the anomalies of Japan’s approach to the death penalty that a stricken conscience can bring the system grinding to a halt. At least two Japanese justice ministers have refused to sign execution orders, most recently Seiken Sugiura, a ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - 8 hours ago]
First reported Sep 29 2014 - Updated Sep 29 2014 - 1 reports

Cement ties

The Surma river at Chhattak. The town lies hundreds of kilometres upstream from Dhaka, one of the world's fastest growing citiesSource: All photos: Tom Felix Joehnk A 17km industrial conveyor belt carries in limestone from a mine in the Khasi Hills ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 29 2014]
Entities: India
First reported Sep 26 2014 - Updated Sep 26 2014 - 1 reports

A fragile peace

AFTER months of stalemate, Afghanistan's warring presidential candidates have reached a settlement. Now they must contend with a volatile security situation and the country's ailing economy  Continue reading ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 26 2014]
Entities: Afghanistan, Security
First reported Sep 26 2014 - Updated Sep 26 2014 - 1 reports

Don't touch those ballots

INDONESIA can credibly claim to be South-East Asia 's most democratic country. That does not solely reflect weak competition—though of course in a democracy contest it takes little to beat Cambodia, Vietnam, Myanmar or, these days, Thailand. It also ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 26 2014]
First reported Sep 25 2014 - Updated Sep 25 2014 - 1 reports

Time to make in India?

NO ONE doubts that Narendra Modi, India's prime minister (pictured), is a capable speaker. On September 25th he called together hundreds of diplomats, business leaders, journalists, ministers and others to a swanky hall in Delhi to launch his latest ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 25 2014]
First reported Sep 22 2014 - Updated Sep 22 2014 - 1 reports

Divide and rule

AFGHANISTAN has been held hostage by political stalemate for months. On September 21st it was finally broken, when the country’s two feuding presidential candidates, Ashraf Ghani and Abdullah Abdullah, signed a power-sharing agreement. Though the ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 22 2014]
First reported Sep 21 2014 - Updated Sep 21 2014 - 1 reports

Clean sweep

WINNING a third term is a remarkable achievement for any political party. New Zealand’s centre-right National Party did so on September 20th, carried to victory, as expected, by its popular leader and the country’s current prime minister, John Key ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 21 2014]
First reported Sep 19 2014 - Updated Sep 19 2014 - 1 reports

Back to the future

IT IS difficult to match central Tokyo’s gleaming plantation of concrete spires today with grainy images of the rickety capital in 1959. Still rebuilding from America’s wartime firebombing, Japan’s capital stunned the world by winning the right to ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 19 2014]
First reported Sep 13 2014 - Updated Sep 13 2014 - 1 reports

Costly errors

AS IF the mood were not already gloomy enough among Japan’s leftwingers, on September 11th the Asahi, the best-selling liberal newspaper, was obliged to publish a second embarrassing retraction of one of its past articles. The group’s president and chief ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 13 2014]
First reported Sep 11 2014 - Updated Sep 11 2014 - 1 reports

Muzzling the messenger

EVER since gaining independence in 2002, Timor-Leste has boasted one of Asia’s freest presses . Its media exposed the mismanagement of state funds, corruption and other scandals involving government employees. But their freedom could come to an abrupt ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 11 2014]
First reported Sep 09 2014 - Updated Sep 09 2014 - 1 reports

Predictable tragedy

THREE factors regularly conspire to bring tragedy to north India and Pakistan, often at this time of year. The Himalayan mountain range is young, steep and unstable: landslides and flash floods are all too common. The summer monsoon reliably delivers ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 09 2014]
First reported Sep 07 2014 - Updated Sep 07 2014 - 1 reports

Blocking the winner

WHEN, on the night of Indonesia's presidential election, all reliable quick counts showed Joko Widodo, universally known as Jokowi, defeating Prabowo Subianto by around five percentage points, Mr Prabowo (pictured above) refused to concede . Wait ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 07 2014]

Quotes

Jeffrey Winters , a politicalpolitical scientist at Northwestern University who specialises in Indonesia, told me that "You cannot understand these two figures [meaning the two candidates, Joko Widodo, known universally as Jokowi, and Prabowo Subianto] without placing them in the context of ten years of SBY" the acronym by which Indonesia's current president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, is known...
..."Thailand's progress," the release concluded, is "greater than progress made by other countries previously upgraded in the U S TIP [Trafficking in Persons] report." All things considered it was a rather odd release, bearing as it did the tone of objection to a punishment not yet levied...
...A factory worker said "they came to any company with Chinese script outside…First they smashed things outside, then they got inside and continued smashing."  Eventually hundreds of people were arrested, according to local media , but by then... Continue reading

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All (168) | News (0) | Reports (0) | Blogs (168) | Audio/Video (0) | Fact Sheets (0) | Press Releases (0)
sort by: Date | Relevance
Hanging tough [Published Banyan - The Economist - 8 hours ago]
Cement ties [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 29 2014]
A fragile peace [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 26 2014]
Don't touch those ballots [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 26 2014]
Time to make in India? [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 25 2014]
Divide and rule [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 22 2014]
Clean sweep [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 21 2014]
Back to the future [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 19 2014]
Costly errors [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 13 2014]
Muzzling the messenger [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 11 2014]
Predictable tragedy [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 09 2014]
Blocking the winner [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 07 2014]
Toxic legacy [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 05 2014]
The leftovers [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 04 2014]
The White Wolf [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 04 2014]
Unleashing the mob [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 01 2014]
Tooling up [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 01 2014]
Too sexy for the catwalk [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 29 2014]
It takes two [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 28 2014]
Farewell to a fighting diplomat [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 26 2014]
Look both ways [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 25 2014]
Wars of words [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 21 2014]
A Cambodian solution [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 20 2014]
Two steps back [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 20 2014]
Looking inward [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 19 2014]
Strangers by choice [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 19 2014]
Seeking meat on the bones [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 15 2014]
The uncompensated [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 13 2014]
Wrath of Khan [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 11 2014]
Justice late, better than never [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 07 2014]
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sort by: Date | Relevance
Hanging tough [Published Banyan - The Economist - 8 hours ago]
IT IS one of the anomalies of Japan’s approach to the death penalty that a stricken conscience can bring the system grinding to a halt. At least two Japanese justice ministers have refused to sign execution orders, most recently Seiken Sugiura, a ...
Cement ties [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 29 2014]
The Surma river at Chhattak. The town lies hundreds of kilometres upstream from Dhaka, one of the world's fastest growing citiesSource: All photos: Tom Felix Joehnk A 17km industrial conveyor belt carries in limestone from a mine in the Khasi Hills ...
A fragile peace [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 26 2014]
AFTER months of stalemate, Afghanistan's warring presidential candidates have reached a settlement. Now they must contend with a volatile security situation and the country's ailing economy  Continue reading ...
Don't touch those ballots [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 26 2014]
INDONESIA can credibly claim to be South-East Asia 's most democratic country. That does not solely reflect weak competition—though of course in a democracy contest it takes little to beat Cambodia, Vietnam, Myanmar or, these days, Thailand. It also ...
Time to make in India? [Published Banyan - The Economist - Sep 25 2014]
NO ONE doubts that Narendra Modi, India's prime minister (pictured), is a capable speaker. On September 25th he called together hundreds of diplomats, business leaders, journalists, ministers and others to a swanky hall in Delhi to launch his latest ...
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
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