Publication: Banyan - The Economist

First reported Aug 29 2014 - Updated Aug 29 2014 - 1 reports

Too sexy for the catwalk

THE live-tweeted downfall of Gulnara Karimova, the once-glamorous daughter of Uzbekistan's dictator, was perhaps the most intriguing story out of Central Asia last year. This year her fate is still mystifying—nonetheless so since her Twitter feed ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 29 2014]
First reported Aug 28 2014 - Updated Aug 28 2014 - 1 reports

It takes two

IT SEEMS everyone wants the Afghan presidential election to be over and done with. Except, maybe, for the two contenders. In the latest attempt to derail an audit of the votes, which was set in motion six weeks ago, Abdullah Abdullah (pictured above) ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 28 2014]
First reported Aug 26 2014 - Updated Aug 26 2014 - 1 reports

Farewell to a fighting diplomat

EACH time the commander of the foreign forces in Afghanistan, an American general named Joseph Dunford, visited the country’s presidential palace he first made a quick dash to the wardrobe. He went to switch out his camouflage fatigues and combat ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 26 2014]
First reported Aug 25 2014 - Updated Aug 26 2014 - 1 reports

Look both ways

TO start the new week, Vietnam announced that it would be sending a senior official from its Communist Party to Beijing, to promote "healthy" bilateral relations between the two countries. On the very same day Vietnamese diplomats were playing host ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 25 2014]
First reported Aug 21 2014 - Updated Aug 21 2014 - 1 reports

Wars of words

IN THE dog days of August, Japan and one of its former colonies, South Korea, mark a string of painful anniversaries. The culmination must be for the end of the second world war every August 15th, which is celebrated as “Liberation Day” by the Koreans. ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 21 2014]
First reported Aug 20 2014 - Updated Aug 21 2014 - 1 reports

A Cambodian solution

ON AUGUST 19th Australia’s government announced that it would release more than 1,500 asylum-seekers from detention, all of them children. Advocates for the refugees welcomed the news. The immigration ministry however is not about to soften the conservative ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 20 2014]
First reported Aug 20 2014 - Updated Aug 20 2014 - 1 reports

Two steps back

IMRAN KHAN, a former star cricketer turned politician, is overly fond of cricketing metaphors. For the past six days he has delivered speeches peppered with corny references to the sport, to cheers from the thousands of followers he has protesting ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 20 2014]
First reported Aug 19 2014 - Updated Aug 20 2014 - 1 reports

Strangers by choice

FEW subjects can matter more in the long term than how India and China, with nearly 40% of the world’s population between them, manage to get along. In the years before they fought a short border war, in 1962, relations had been rosy. Many in China, ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 19 2014]
First reported Aug 19 2014 - Updated Aug 19 2014 - 1 reports

Looking inward

SAM is the son of immigrants from China, who came to Thailand early in the 20th century. Sitting on a bench facing Bangkok’s Chinatown, he speaks in American-inflected English to tell of a job he worked at Paramount’s studios in Hollywood of the 1960s, ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 19 2014]
First reported Aug 15 2014 - Updated Aug 15 2014 - 1 reports

Seeking meat on the bones

INDIA’S prime minister, Narendra Modi, has developed an admirably direct style of public speaking. On August 15th he delivered his first Independence Day address, without a script, in Hindi, from the walls of the Red Fort in Delhi. He wore a flowing ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 15 2014]
First reported Aug 13 2014 - Updated Aug 13 2014 - 1 reports

The uncompensated

WHEN sharp lights beamed through his windows in the dead of one January night in 2010, in the village of Khatawa in Paktia Province, Haji Sharabuddin feared Taliban militants had come to attack his family. His son ventured outside to face the intruders, ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 13 2014]
First reported Aug 11 2014 - Updated Aug 11 2014 - 1 reports

Wrath of Khan

LAST summer was an historic one for Pakistan. Not only did a civilian government manage to serve a full five-year term, at long last, but the country also saw its first-ever transition of power between two elected governments. It sparked heady optimism ... [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 11 2014]

Quotes

Jeffrey Winters , a politicalpolitical scientist at Northwestern University who specialises in Indonesia, told me that "You cannot understand these two figures [meaning the two candidates, Joko Widodo, known universally as Jokowi, and Prabowo Subianto] without placing them in the context of ten years of SBY" the acronym by which Indonesia's current president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, is known...
..."Thailand's progress," the release concluded, is "greater than progress made by other countries previously upgraded in the U S TIP [Trafficking in Persons] report." All things considered it was a rather odd release, bearing as it did the tone of objection to a punishment not yet levied...
...A factory worker said "they came to any company with Chinese script outside…First they smashed things outside, then they got inside and continued smashing."  Eventually hundreds of people were arrested, according to local media , but by then... Continue reading

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All (168) | News (0) | Reports (0) | Blogs (168) | Audio/Video (0) | Fact Sheets (0) | Press Releases (0)
sort by: Date | Relevance
Too sexy for the catwalk [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 29 2014]
It takes two [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 28 2014]
Farewell to a fighting diplomat [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 26 2014]
Look both ways [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 25 2014]
Wars of words [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 21 2014]
A Cambodian solution [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 20 2014]
Two steps back [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 20 2014]
Looking inward [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 19 2014]
Strangers by choice [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 19 2014]
Seeking meat on the bones [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 15 2014]
The uncompensated [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 13 2014]
Wrath of Khan [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 11 2014]
Justice late, better than never [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 07 2014]
Five hundred days of dictatorship [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 05 2014]
Where’s the protest? [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 03 2014]
Great big pool of sovereignty [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 01 2014]
Forced landing [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 30 2014]
The election that never ended [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 29 2014]
Back to your seats [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 24 2014]
A new kind of president [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 23 2014]
What good will come of it? [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 18 2014]
How the big rig rolls [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 17 2014]
Glad-handled [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 16 2014]
The people concerned [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 15 2014]
Bad science [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 10 2014]
What happens now? [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 10 2014]
Amit Shah rises [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 09 2014]
The lion and the lamb [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 08 2014]
Reformer Rao [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 08 2014]
Stuffed sheep [Published Banyan - The Economist - Jul 08 2014]
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sort by: Date | Relevance
Too sexy for the catwalk [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 29 2014]
THE live-tweeted downfall of Gulnara Karimova, the once-glamorous daughter of Uzbekistan's dictator, was perhaps the most intriguing story out of Central Asia last year. This year her fate is still mystifying—nonetheless so since her Twitter feed ...
It takes two [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 28 2014]
IT SEEMS everyone wants the Afghan presidential election to be over and done with. Except, maybe, for the two contenders. In the latest attempt to derail an audit of the votes, which was set in motion six weeks ago, Abdullah Abdullah (pictured above) ...
Farewell to a fighting diplomat [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 26 2014]
EACH time the commander of the foreign forces in Afghanistan, an American general named Joseph Dunford, visited the country’s presidential palace he first made a quick dash to the wardrobe. He went to switch out his camouflage fatigues and combat ...
Look both ways [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 25 2014]
TO start the new week, Vietnam announced that it would be sending a senior official from its Communist Party to Beijing, to promote "healthy" bilateral relations between the two countries. On the very same day Vietnamese diplomats were playing host ...
Wars of words [Published Banyan - The Economist - Aug 21 2014]
IN THE dog days of August, Japan and one of its former colonies, South Korea, mark a string of painful anniversaries. The culmination must be for the end of the second world war every August 15th, which is celebrated as “Liberation Day” by the Koreans. ...
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
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